Columns
10 years on Image

10 years on

Melbourne Water moving to Docklands
Read more >>

Away from the desk Image

Away from the desk

The little bent tree
Read more >>

Chamber update Image

Chamber update

COVID-19 and the Chamber’s response
Read more >>

Docklander Image

Docklander

Empowering women locally and abroad
Read more >>

Docklands Secrets Image

Docklands Secrets

Conflicting speeds
Read more >>

Chinese

零工经济的灰色区域
Read more >>

Fashion Image

Fashion

Top five street style trends
Read more >>

Health and Wellbeing Image

Health and Wellbeing

Five strategies to get through coronavirus (COVID-19)
Read more >>

Letters Image

Letters

Bring on the lasers
Read more >>

Business Image

Business

New offerings at The District Docklands Market Lane
Read more >>

Owners Corporation Law Image

Owners Corporation Law

Social distancing in apartment blocks is hard to do, but necessary right now
Read more >>

Maritime

Maritime matters
Read more >>

Pets Corner Image

Pets Corner

Adorable therapy
Read more >>

Precinct Perspectives

A new perspective from Batman’s Hill
Read more >>

SkyPad Living Image

SkyPad Living

A chair’s perspective of vertical living in COVID-19 times
Read more >>

Street Art Image

Street Art

Goodbye from Blender Studios
Read more >>

Sustainability

Sustainability in a pandemic world
Read more >>

The District

Eat your way through our most delicious hot spots
Read more >>

We Live Here Image

We Live Here

We need a clear cladding policy – now!
Read more >>

Abby's Angle  Image

Abby's Angle

Slow down. The panic is coursing through all our veins
Read more >>

Value in self and community

06 Aug 2017

Value in self and community Image

After a decade in the corporate world, Tara Nadun is incubating a community project in Docklands.

Ms Nadun organised a community workshop for dozens of people at Library at The Dock on July 31.

At the workshop, participants were asked to connect through social media and keep in touch after their first meeting to exchange their skills.

For example, someone who speaks a second language and wants to learn some programming can meet up with an IT professional who wants to acquire a new language.

The pilot program, called valU, will run on three months’ trial and at the end Ms Nadun will assess its success and amend the program or decide what to bring on next.

She said the program was much more than a simple “barter system”.

“Through the program, I want the participants to find and acknowledge value in themselves and the community. There are so many good things about ourselves and we need to accept ourselves,” Ms Nadun said.

She said self-acceptance was a starting point for people to bring out their potentials and contribute to the community.

“When you don’t require people’s approval to realise your value, you have the courage to do more things and help other people.”

The July 31 event marked the beginning of Ms Nadun’s journey to encourage self-acceptance and bring together the community.

She said she chose Docklands for the experimental program because she saw a great sense of community here.

“The amount of work that’s been done in Docklands to engage with the community is really impressive,” she said.

“My old boss had his son’s birthday party at Library at The Dock, and he said this place was very welcoming and everyone loved coming to this space.”

“If this place is already connecting with people, then it sounds like the right place for the program,” Ms Nadun said.

After resigning from her corporate job last month, Ms Nadun said she was fully committed to the valU project and wanted to eventually expand it into a social enterprise.

But before then, Docklands will be the hatching place of this creative program.

Share on Facebook

Stay in touch with Docklands. Subscribe to FREE monthly e-Newspaper.

You must be registered with Docklands News to be able to post comments.
To register, please click here.