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Final story for the year

02 Dec 2014

Final story for the year Image

By Chloe Strahan
The final installment of the ‘Words on the Wind’ series at Docklands Library is being brought to us by storyteller Roslyn Quin.

The Library at the Dock has hosted nine storytellers over the past few months sharing their tales inspired by Docklands and Roslyn’s show As The River Tells It, on December 18 will be this year’s final performance.

Roslyn takes the audience on a journey that transforms the Docklands into a mythological fantasy land, drawing inspirations from the city’s history and traditional folklore.

“When writing stories I use the area and the landscape around to create a new mythology and stories to fit inside that mythology. All of my stories are very much inspired by the old folklores of all different countries,” Roslyn said.

“I wanted to do something new inspired by the area that has a lot of history and a lot of stories attached to it,” she said.

Roslyn’s own family has a history around the Docklands, with her grandfather arriving in Victoria Harbour five years ago.

Roslyn explains that her often dark and complicated storylines are tailored mostly to adults.

“A lot of folklore are great ways to explore topics without alienating anyone or making people feel sad. You can explore topics like death by turning it into a fantasy. It’s not so confronting.”

Roslyn incorporates music, puppetry, poetry and movement into her performances to enhance the storytelling experience for the audience, yet doesn’t lose focus of her voice as the most important tool.

“I try to let the storytelling stand on its own and only be decorated by props. My stories are not staged either. I know the story that I am telling but the words that I use sort of flow out of me in an improvised style.”

Roslyn’s close-knit friends are assisting with the props, making a custom made puppet and improvising music on stage to match the mood of the story.

“It’s kind of like a jam session but I’m not using an instrument I am using my voice,” Roslyn said.

This eccentric tale is haunting, original and colourful, with an array of make-believe characters derived from the history of the Docklands.

As the River Tells It will be held on December 18 at the Library at the Dock.

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