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10 years on Image

10 years on

Melbourne Water moving to Docklands
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Away from the desk

The little bent tree
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Chamber update

COVID-19 and the Chamber’s response
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Docklander

Empowering women locally and abroad
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Docklands Secrets

Conflicting speeds
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Chinese

滨海港区不在新的日照控制计划内
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Fashion

Top five street style trends
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Health and Wellbeing

Five strategies to get through coronavirus (COVID-19)
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Letters

Bring on the lasers
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Business

New offerings at The District Docklands Market Lane
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Owners Corporation Law Image

Owners Corporation Law

Social distancing in apartment blocks is hard to do, but necessary right now
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Pets Corner

Dachshunds for days!
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Precinct Perspectives

A new perspective from Batman’s Hill
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SkyPad Living

A chair’s perspective of vertical living in COVID-19 times
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Street Art

Goodbye from Blender Studios
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Sustainability

Sustainability in a pandemic world
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The District

Eat your way through our most delicious hot spots
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We Live Here

We need a clear cladding policy – now!
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Abby's Angle

Slow down. The panic is coursing through all our veins
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Letters - February 2020

29 Jan 2020

Letters - February 2020 Image

Cyclists off pedestrian paths

All cyclists disregard road rules and ride for their own convenience.

They may not intend to side swipe pedestrians or force them out of their way, however their presence on foot paths results in incidents which makes walking hazardous and creates “anti-cyclist rage.”

Cyclists swerve in and out of traffic, up and off footpaths, travel against the lights and often wonder why both drivers and pedestrians react in an aggressive manner toward them. There is also an increase in their use of ear devices which means they are less aware of potential dangers.

While pulling on their lycra they also pull-on an attitude akin to an Olympic cyclist engaged in a professional race. They ignore speed signs, don’t keep a safe distance from pedestrians and when in packs assume full entitlement on single carriage ways regardless of the bike lane.

Those in civilian clothing are more apologetic of their poor behaviour yet no less disgraceful as they apologise riding past after having dinged their bells to intimidate pedestrians out of their way as they too weave in and out of traffic and on and off the pavement.

I sympathise that cyclists want to avoid being struck by vehicles with four wheels, however I can’t sympathise when they pass their danger onto me as a pedestrian. Just as cyclists are protected by a rule which requires vehicles to keep a one-metre distance between them and the bike, I too want cyclists bound by the same when it comes to pedestrians on shared paths.

I also want to see legislation which protects pedestrians who suffer from hit-and-run cyclists.

There are no road or footpath rules which govern cyclists’ behaviour. They know they are untouchable. They know that councils and the state government want to reduce vehicles on roads, particularly in the CBD. When is legislation going to require cyclists to be registered so that they become accountable for their inappropriate and dangerous behaviour?

More concerning is the increased use of motorised bikes and the proposed introduction of commercial e-bikes to Melbourne. Their riders will join cyclists on footpaths assuming priority over pedestrians and not adjust their behaviour as conditions become more and more congested.

Bikes, scooters and the like belong on the road within the confines of their lane and riders should be clearly registered so that they contribute toward the cost of bike lanes and share pathways and can be made accountable for mishaps they are involved in.

Diana McGowan

Docklands resident, CBD worker and pedestrian.

 

Hidden gems for photographers

There are excellent photo opportunities all around the Docklands, including some hidden gems like the one below.

One just needs to walk around and look at this great suburb from different angles. A great place to load photos is on Google Maps.

The attached image has had 37,000 views.

 

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