Columns
10 years on Image

10 years on

Melbourne Water moving to Docklands
Read more >>

Away from the desk Image

Away from the desk

The little bent tree
Read more >>

Chamber update Image

Chamber update

COVID-19 and Docklands businesses
Read more >>

Docklander Image

Docklander

A staunch Docklander
Read more >>

Docklands Secrets Image

Docklands Secrets

Conflicting speeds
Read more >>

Chinese

墨尔本市长工作寄语
Read more >>

Owners' Corporation Management

Performance-based alternative solutions the key to cheaper cladding replacement costs
Read more >>

Fashion Image

Fashion

Top five street style trends
Read more >>

Health and Wellbeing Image

Health and Wellbeing

Don’t let working from home compromise your health and wellbeing
Read more >>

Letters Image

Letters

Bring on the lasers
Read more >>

Business Image

Business

Something fishy from The Espressionist
Read more >>

Owners Corporation Law Image

Owners Corporation Law

Social distancing in apartment blocks is hard to do, but necessary right now
Read more >>

Maritime

Tyranny of distance?
Read more >>

Pets Corner Image

Pets Corner

Full of Beans!
Read more >>

SkyPad Living Image

SkyPad Living

OC support in a time of COVID-19 - a tale of two cities …
Read more >>

Street Art Image

Street Art

Goodbye from Blender Studios
Read more >>

Sustainability

How fast is fast fashion?
Read more >>

The District

Eat your way through our most delicious hot spots
Read more >>

We Live Here Image

We Live Here

Microorganism dismantles Airbnb - will it ever recover?
Read more >>

Abby's Angle  Image

Abby's Angle

The world is a battlefield. Fight, but without exception, choose kindness
Read more >>

Editions

Our green rooftops

02 Dec 2015

Our green rooftops Image

Docklands is Melbourne’s leading suburb when it comes to putting its rooftops to “green” uses, but there remains plenty of untapped potential across local buildings.

A recent analysis of Melbourne’s rooftops by the City of Melbourne found that Docklands had the greatest area of green roof in Melbourne, with over 11ha of greenery on our rooftops.

According to Cr Arron Wood, a high proportion of Docklands properties are also topped by solar panels.

“We also know from previous studies that Docklands has the highest concentration of Green Star rated buildings in the country,” Cr Wood said.

“Our mapping of potential for greening indicates strong potential for expansion of existing green roofs and construction of new green roofs. The same is true for solar and cool roofs.”

The study of Docklands’ rooftops was part of the City of Melbourne’s wider look at the Melbourne municipality’s potential for increasing uptake of solar, cool and green roofs through The Rooftop Project.

Lord Mayor Robert Doyle said The Rooftop Project involved analysing aerial photographs to understand where rooftops could be transformed using solar panels, reflective materials or vegetation.

“There is so much potential right above us,” the Lord Mayor said.

According to the council’s research, rooftops in Melbourne make up 880 hectares of space.

“Most of these rooftops are used only to store heating and cooling equipment,” Cr Doyle said. “We could set them up to generate clean energy, increase property values and cool temperatures within the city.”

The Rooftop Project research reveals Melbourne rooftops have the potential to house:

  • 637 hectares of solar panels;
  • 259 hectares of cool roofs (reducing the amount of heat held and transferred to the building below;
  • 236 hectares of intensive green roofs (heavier vegetated landscapes); and
  • 328 hectares of extensive green roofs (lightweight vegetated landscapes).

The mapping shows green or vegetated roofs are most suitable in built up areas such as the CBD, Port Melbourne and Docklands, while larger commercial and industrial buildings outside the CBD have great potential to house solar panels.

Cr Wood encouraged residents and business owners across Melbourne to look at the maps and consider whether their roof could be used to help reduce energy bills and save the environment.

He said rooftop solar would play an important role in helping the municipality’s goal of sourcing 25 per cent of its electricity from renewable energy by 2018.

“Our research shows that solar panels could be installed on 637 hectares of rooftops – that’s three times the size of the Hoddle Grid,” Cr Wood said.

“These households and businesses could be making use of the sunlight that falls on their roofs by installing solar,” Cr Wood said.

The City of Melbourne is look for partners to work with on the creation of the city’s first publicly accessible green roof. Owners with suitable roofs are encouraged to contact the council.

You can learn more about The Rooftop Project and view the maps at http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/SUSTAINABILITY/ROOFTOPPROJECT/Pages/Rooftop.aspx

Share on Facebook

Stay in touch with Docklands. Subscribe to FREE monthly e-Newspaper.

You must be registered with Docklands News to be able to post comments.
To register, please click here.