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Editions

Mural’s fate is unknown

03 Jul 2014

Mural’s fate is unknown Image

The fate of Adrian Doyle’s controversial artwork at The Quays remains unknown, with residents understood to be divided over the murals.

In May, The Age reported a resident of the building was so offended by the work that they wanted it painted over, and had threatened to take the issue to the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission.

The murals are located in the loading bay of the building in Palmyra Way. The larger mural depicts a seaside suburban town and the resident is understood to have taken issue with an image of a crucifixion and of a woman hanging out washing.

The other mural depicts a crying infant and it is understood the resident is offended by the image because she believes the child is depicted as being indigenous.

The stance of The Quays OC is unknown, with strata manager Adrian Quinn declining to comment and requests for comment from the OC chair going unanswered.

However, some residents of the building have expressed their support for the murals, according to artist Adrian Doyle.

Mr Doyle said he first became aware of the complaint after receiving emails from residents who wanted to save the artwork.

He said he did not believe the murals were offensive and said they depicted himself and his family.

He said the woman hanging out the washing was his mother and the crying infant was not indigenous.

Mr Doyle said the crucifix figure was originally his father but had been changed to Ned Kelly, keeping his father’s eyes.

“It’s looking at how much my parents have sacrificed to live the Australian dream,” Mr Doyle said. “Docklands, in a way, is part of the Australian dream.”

Mr Doyle said he had creative control over the artwork and it had been signed off by the involved parties, including the Owners Corporation and the architecture firm which commissioned the work, Charles McBride Ryan.

Mr Doyle said the building owned the artwork but the image itself was owned by himself and he would fight to ensure it was not painted over.

“It would be a shame for Docklands to lose this piece,” Mr Doyle said.

A spokesperson for the Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission said she was unable to confirm or deny if a complaint had been received over the artwork due to confidentiality provisions.

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