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Melbourne in frames

06 Aug 2017

Melbourne in frames Image

Framed photographs of Melbourne have been installed at a Melbourne Quarter construction hoarding on the corner of Flinders and Spencer streets.

Urban Surfaces, a public art installation by RMIT’s School of Architecture and Design and Lendlease’s Melbourne Quarter development, beautifies a long-term hoarding at the high pedestrian traffic area.

The RMIT students were asked to develop approaches to the design and installation of the urban creative project and initially created a postcard and social media campaign, Frame Melbourne, which invited locals and visitors to share their images of Melbourne.

Some 150 photographs have since been used to form Urban Surfaces, with each image partnered with a corresponding frame set in relief against Tarama Schneider’s Australian floral wallpaper.

The displayed photographs showcase Melbourne’s rich diversity and urban culture through combining creative expressions and personal connections with the city.

The hoarding is approximately 17 metres long and is situated next to the tram sculpture in front of the Grand Hotel.

Melbourne Quarter’s project director, Brian Herlihy, said the project could enhance the bond between the community and emerging designers.

“This installation not only tests how public artwork interacts with the wider community, but engages students in a real-life installation of urban street artwork,” he said.

“This is an exciting opportunity for students to implement interactive technologies while creating something beautiful that the wider community can appreciate and enjoy.”

Dr Ross Mcleod and Dr Charles Anderson from RMIT’s School of Architecture, who co-ordinated the project, said the artwork captured the community’s perspective of Melbourne’s essence.

“Many of the photos on display were taken looking through a window at a favourite view of the city. Artworks in this urban context help foster and encourage a sense of common sharing and collaboration,” Dr Mcleod said.

The artwork will be on display for up to 12 months. The photos can also be viewed on http://www.framemelbourne.org and via Instagram @framemelb.

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