Columns
10 years on Image

10 years on

Melbourne Water moving to Docklands
Read more >>

Away from the desk Image

Away from the desk

The little bent tree
Read more >>

Chamber update Image

Chamber update

COVID-19 and Docklands businesses
Read more >>

Docklander Image

Docklander

A staunch Docklander
Read more >>

Docklands Secrets Image

Docklands Secrets

Conflicting speeds
Read more >>

Chinese

墨尔本市长工作寄语
Read more >>

Owners' Corporation Management

Performance-based alternative solutions the key to cheaper cladding replacement costs
Read more >>

Fashion Image

Fashion

Top five street style trends
Read more >>

Health and Wellbeing Image

Health and Wellbeing

Don’t let working from home compromise your health and wellbeing
Read more >>

Letters Image

Letters

Bring on the lasers
Read more >>

Business Image

Business

Something fishy from The Espressionist
Read more >>

Owners Corporation Law Image

Owners Corporation Law

Social distancing in apartment blocks is hard to do, but necessary right now
Read more >>

Maritime

Tyranny of distance?
Read more >>

Pets Corner Image

Pets Corner

Full of Beans!
Read more >>

SkyPad Living Image

SkyPad Living

OC support in a time of COVID-19 - a tale of two cities …
Read more >>

Street Art Image

Street Art

Goodbye from Blender Studios
Read more >>

Sustainability

How fast is fast fashion?
Read more >>

The District

Eat your way through our most delicious hot spots
Read more >>

We Live Here Image

We Live Here

Microorganism dismantles Airbnb - will it ever recover?
Read more >>

Abby's Angle  Image

Abby's Angle

The world is a battlefield. Fight, but without exception, choose kindness
Read more >>

Editions

Let there be Firelight!

04 Jul 2018

Let there be Firelight! Image

The second annual Firelight Festival erupted successfully in Docklands at the end of June.

The footprint was bigger, the surging crowds were larger and the weather was perfectly cold over June 29, June 30 and July 1.

Pitched perfectly at families (starting and finishing early) the vibe suggested that Docklands has now found an event that can be sustained and grown in the future.

The festival expanded to include Harbour Esplanade and Victoria Harbour Promenade, but NewQuay still offered the best ambiance.

The Victoria Harbour side was darker, colder and far less inviting with many harbourside businesses ignoring the opportunity and choosing to remain closed.

In contrast, Berth and Cargo owners turned their patch into a mini-festival in its own right, investing heavily in infrastructure and putting on an extra 30 staff each night.

Proprietor John Scardamaglia said he sold about 30 per cent more paella through a pop-up food stall than in 2017.

“It was a ripper weekend,” Mr Scardamaglia said. “We had lines at the paella stand on all three nights.”

“The whole event was executed really well and the city should be congratulated.”

“For us, it ticked all the boxes. It has a great family feel, so they were definitely pitching to the right demographic.”

He said the introduction of a DJ also set an interactive tone, with people more inclined to break into spontaneous dancing.

He said the restaurants themselves were quiet, which he interpreted as people wanting to participate in the festival itself.

Docklands Chamber of Commerce president, Joh Maxwell, said: “The festival warmed up further each night and the flame shows every 15 minutes were magnificent.”

“The traders who didn’t participate let themselves down because they had every opportunity to participate.”

Share on Facebook

Stay in touch with Docklands. Subscribe to FREE monthly e-Newspaper.

You must be registered with Docklands News to be able to post comments.
To register, please click here.