Columns
10 years on Image

10 years on

Council given more planning powers
Read more >>

Away from the desk Image

Away from the desk

The little bent tree
Read more >>

Docklander Image

Docklander

Lormier St towers get full makeover from Docklands’ “Foyer Queen”
Read more >>

Docklands Secrets Image

Docklands Secrets

Conflicting speeds
Read more >>

Chinese

政府资助 受创商家
Read more >>

Critic

A vote for uncertainty
Read more >>

Owners' Corporation Management

Performance-based alternative solutions the key to cheaper cladding replacement costs
Read more >>

Fashion Image

Fashion

Top five street style trends
Read more >>

Health and Wellbeing Image

Health and Wellbeing

Managing aches and pains
Read more >>

Letters Image

Letters

Here’s an idea …
Read more >>

History

A view to a hill (with an explosive secret)
Read more >>

Housing All Australians

Housing All Australians – a new paradigm
Read more >>

Business Image

Business

Docklands Dental Studio becomes an industry leader
Read more >>

Owners Corporation Law Image

Owners Corporation Law

VCAT declares that committees have the power to terminate an OC manager
Read more >>

Maritime

Celebrating our Enterprize
Read more >>

Pets Corner Image

Pets Corner

Ty the adorable rescue
Read more >>

SkyPad Living Image

SkyPad Living

Finally, vertical villages are on government’s radar – but is the focus right?
Read more >>

Precinct Perspectives

Explore public art in Batman’s Hill
Read more >>

State MP

After COVID-19: do we want to go back to “normal”?
Read more >>

Street Art Image

Street Art

Goodbye from Blender Studios
Read more >>

Sustainability

How fast is fast fashion?
Read more >>

The District

Your local delicatessen has arrived!
Read more >>

We Live Here Image

We Live Here

Stage 3 lockdown fines for short-stays
Read more >>

Abby's Angle  Image

Abby's Angle

Getting through lockdown 2.0
Read more >>

Editions
August 09 Edition Cover

Harbour Esplanade plea

05 Mar 2015

Harbour Esplanade plea Image

Docklands developer and resident David Napier has implored the City of Melbourne to bring forward funding for the upgrade of Harbour Esplanade in a single stage.

Current plans allow for the development of Docklands over 10 to 15 years, but Mr Napier says work needs to happen in one stage in the near future.

Addressing the Docklands Community Forum on February 25, Mr Napier said: “I personally believe the development of Docklands has been held back because of the barrier Harbour Esplanade is to visitors.”

“I think it deserves an upgrade over a much shorter time-frame than what is being planned.”

Mr Napier referred to the $300 million committed to Docklands community infrastructure by the Docklands Community and Place Plan (DCPP) and to council’s predicted $57 million surplus from Docklands over the next five years.

“I’m imploring the Melbourne City Council to contribute some of those funds to a one-stage upgrade of Harbour Esplanade, rather than the 10 to 15 years planned,” he said.

He also called on further discussion about the future of Harbour Esplanade, saying the community consultation conducted prior to the release of the master plan last year did not necessarily reflect the community’s desires.

“Only 460 people responded to the community consultation,” Mr Napier said. “Based on this, certain assumptions have been made which I think don’t necessarily represent community interests.”

Mr Napier said he believed Harbour Esplanade should be transformed into a linear park with trees, barbecues and potential for temporary structures, rather than permanent buildings.

He argued that the esplanade should remain at one level, as opposed to the multiple raised platforms, which would be reinstated according to the master plan.

He also objected to the built form limits outlined in the master plan, which would allow up to 50 per cent development along both the waterfront and street edge.

“We haven’t opened up the waterfront to then close it up with buildings,” Mr Napier said.

He rejected claims that built form was necessary to ameliorate the affects of wind and said this could be achieved through screening and planting.

“We don’t need buildings to stop the wind, we just need clever, considered landscape to achieve that objective,” he said.

Mr Napier also opposed the complete reinstatement of heritage sheds along Harbour Esplanade but said shed “skeletons” would be acceptable.

A City of Melbourne spokesperson said  the $300 million figure related to an estimate of the cost of all projects included in the DCPP.

“Funds to deliver the DCPP would be required from a number of agencies including the State Government, Places Victoria, private developers and the City of Melbourne and would be required over a 10-year period from 2012 to 2022,” the spokesperson said.

“The City of Melbourne’s contribution to Harbour Esplanade would need to be assessed by council alongside competing demands related to the delivery of other key DCPP projects.”

The spokesperson said varied views about what Harbour Esplanade should include were expressed during the community consultation process.

According to the spokesperson, these ranged from a linear park with no permanent buildings or structures through to a mix of hard and soft landscaped open spaces with some buildings.

“Council has not yet considered the master plan or its position on what would be right for Harbour Esplanade,” the spokesperson said.

“Council welcomes Mr Napier’s contribution to this important debate.”

Places Victoria declined to comment specifically on the issues Mr Napier raised.

However, Places Victoria CEO Gregory Anderson has previously defended the Harbour Esplanade consultation process.

“Places Victoria is confident the engagement process provided a genuine opportunity to contribute to the conversation about Harbour Esplanade for a broad range of people, including Docklands residents, workers and visitors,” Mr Anderson said.

“We spoke with more than 300 people, shared information with almost 4000 people via the Participate Melbourne website, and 455 people filled in the questionaire.”

Places Victoria general manager Simon Wilson has also previously commented on the built form limits in the masterplan.

“Feedback from the community during the engagement process showed people were generally confortable with a mix of 40 per cent built form and 60 per cent open space,” Mr Wilson said.

“The masterplan respects the community’s desire for passive, open spaces through the incorporaiton of green areas along Harbour Esplanade and makes provision for slightly less than 40 per cent built form.”

Share on Facebook

Stay in touch with Docklands. Subscribe to FREE monthly e-Newspaper.

You must be registered with Docklands News to be able to post comments.
To register, please click here.