Columns
10 years on Image

10 years on

Bargain hunters descend on Docklands
Read more >>

Away from the desk Image

Away from the desk

The little bent tree
Read more >>

Chamber update Image

Chamber update

Bricks and Clicks – David Koch
Read more >>

Docklander Image

Docklander

Helping future generations tackle waste
Read more >>

Docklands Secrets Image

Docklands Secrets

Conflicting speeds
Read more >>

Fashion Image

Fashion

Top five street style trends
Read more >>

Health and Wellbeing Image

Health and Wellbeing

Women’s Health Week is here
Read more >>

Letters Image

Letters

Get rid of it
Read more >>

New Businesses Image

New Businesses

Fear of the dentist? Fear not!
Read more >>

Owners Corporation Law Image

Owners Corporation Law

Refund stamp duty to those affected by flammable cladding
Read more >>

Pets Corner Image

Pets Corner

A Docklands duo
Read more >>

Precinct Perspectives

A day in the life of Victoria Harbour
Read more >>

SkyPad Living Image

SkyPad Living

Vertical living style
Read more >>

Street Art Image

Street Art

Goodbye from Blender Studios
Read more >>

The District

The District Docklands in 24 hours
Read more >>

We Live Here Image

We Live Here

Small print shrinks state cladding fund
Read more >>

What Women Want - With Abby Crawford Image

What Women Want - With Abby Crawford

We have to do better than this
Read more >>

Docklanders dig deep daily

01 Apr 2010

By Alison Kinkade

Through a City of Melbourne initiative to increase recycling and reduce landfill, Docklands residents have now donated more than 30,000 kg of goods to St Vincent de Paul.

The project, which has seen charity bins being placed in 13 Docklands apartment blocks, started as a trial with five apartments in November, 2008.

The City of Melbourne’s Future Melbourne (Eco-City) Committee Chair, Cr Cathy Oke, said the amount of goods donated had been a significant result for St Vincent de Paul and for the environment.

“It is amazing that in just over a year, Docklands residents have collected a total of 31,200 kgs of clothing and household goods that would otherwise end up in landfill,” Cr Oke said.

“Congratulations to the residents, building managers and St Vincent de Paul for such a significant reduction in waste to landfill,” she said.

Yarra’s Edge Tower 5 building manager John Beany said he was particularly happy that, due to the bins, clothing no longer went down the garbage chute.

Mr Beany said residents in his building had responsed excellently to the initiative. “Tower 5 puts out one full charity bin almost every week for collection,” he said.

St Vincent de Paul state manager Tony Thornton said that the charity was really pleased with the quality of goods that were being donated, which were then sold or used in welfare work.

“We’re delighted to be in this unique partnership with the City of Melbourne that helps them achieve their recycling aims and us to continue to provide welfare to disadvantaged Victorians,” Mr Thornton said.

The remaining Docklands apartment buildings without the charity containers should receive the bins in the next few months as part of the roll-out of the project.

Docklanders are the first residents in Melbourne to receive the charity bins, however St Vincent de Paul hopes to extend the program to other city locations.

Share on Facebook

Stay in touch with Docklands. Subscribe to FREE monthly e-Newspaper.

You must be registered with Docklands News to be able to post comments.
To register, please click here.

Docklands is Beautiful