Columns
10 years on Image

10 years on

Melbourne Water moving to Docklands
Read more >>

Away from the desk Image

Away from the desk

The little bent tree
Read more >>

Chamber update Image

Chamber update

COVID-19 and the Chamber’s response
Read more >>

Docklander Image

Docklander

Empowering women locally and abroad
Read more >>

Docklands Secrets Image

Docklands Secrets

Conflicting speeds
Read more >>

Chinese

零工经济的灰色区域
Read more >>

Fashion Image

Fashion

Top five street style trends
Read more >>

Health and Wellbeing Image

Health and Wellbeing

Five strategies to get through coronavirus (COVID-19)
Read more >>

Letters Image

Letters

Bring on the lasers
Read more >>

Business Image

Business

New offerings at The District Docklands Market Lane
Read more >>

Owners Corporation Law Image

Owners Corporation Law

Social distancing in apartment blocks is hard to do, but necessary right now
Read more >>

Maritime

Maritime matters
Read more >>

Pets Corner Image

Pets Corner

Adorable therapy
Read more >>

Precinct Perspectives

A new perspective from Batman’s Hill
Read more >>

SkyPad Living Image

SkyPad Living

A chair’s perspective of vertical living in COVID-19 times
Read more >>

Street Art Image

Street Art

Goodbye from Blender Studios
Read more >>

Sustainability

Sustainability in a pandemic world
Read more >>

The District

Eat your way through our most delicious hot spots
Read more >>

We Live Here Image

We Live Here

We need a clear cladding policy – now!
Read more >>

Abby's Angle  Image

Abby's Angle

Slow down. The panic is coursing through all our veins
Read more >>

Council is given planning powers

03 Jul 2012

Council is given planning powers Image

Friday, June 29 was a massive news day for Docklands with Planning Minister Matthew Guy announcing that planning powers were being returned to the City of Melbourne.

Mr Guy also announced approval for MAB Corporation’s revised master-plan which includes new towers and a hotel at NewQuay Central (see our story on page 2).

The City of Melbourne has been lobbying for years for planning control of Docklands but has had to be content with being asked for its comments and recommendations only.

It will now be the arbiter of all developments of less than 25,000 sqm – bringing Docklands into line with the planning rules that exist within the CBD.

For the first time, Docklands planning application will be advertised and residents will be able to lodge objections.

Mr Guy pointed out that the transfer of authority to the council was from the Department of Planning and Community Development and that Places Victoria would retain its role as master developer.

“Places Victoria has created the structure plan for Docklands and they’ve done a wonderful job. Well this is the next stage – that of community focus,” Mr Guy said.

“No developer or Places Victoria can get the nuances right like the City Council can.”

He said the developers had to accept the decision as “a bold new way to move it forward”.

“50 per cent is built, so the next 50 per cent will have a different focus of how it integrates,” he said.

“From today, the residents of Docklands will have a direct connection through their council to planning decisions and will have a stronger voice over decisions that impact upon their community.”

Lord Mayor Robert Doyle said Mr Guy’s decision was very important for consistency of design in Docklands and for using the “great expertise that exists at the City of Melbourne”.

“This is a decision of great foresight and it will be of benefit to the residents of Docklands, both present and future,” he said.

Docklands News understands that developers will still make their applications directly with Places Victoria, as stipulated by their long-standing and legally-binding developer agreements.

In instances where the development is less than 25,000 sqm, Places Victoria will in the future forward the application directly to the City of Melbourne for determination.  

The change means developers will have recourse to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) should they not agree with the council’s decision.  Docklands developers have not enjoyed this privilege in the past.

Developers were generally resigned to having the council determine their applications.  One was openly hostile, while others said it mattered little in the complex labyrinth of bureaucratic overlay.

Share on Facebook

Stay in touch with Docklands. Subscribe to FREE monthly e-Newspaper.

You must be registered with Docklands News to be able to post comments.
To register, please click here.