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10 years on

March 2009, Issue 40
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Away from the desk

The little bent tree
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Mona’s enjoying her upside down life
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Docklands Secrets

Politician disrespects us
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She’s the boss, and I like it!
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Cladding, short-stays and rooming
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Fashion - July 2011

28 Jun 2011

Fashion - July 2011 Image

From secretary to sexetary

By Nicola St John

How to dress for the workplace.

Once upon a time, leopard-print stilletos were considered quite the risque fashion choice – unless of course, you were dancing around a pole.

However, contemporary fashion stakes have changed. Towering heels have become appropriate attire for the workplace, as it seems are see-through blouses and cocktail dresses, worn frequently on a Friday for the ease of transforming work-wear to party-wear.  

Have our standards slipped, or are there no more rules to dressing for the workplace?

Mini skirts, lace sleeveless dresses and all manner of animal prints have seamlessly become demure. And at the other end of the work-wear spectrum, the New York Times recently published an article entitled “Is it OK to wear yoga pants to work?”

If this all sounds very old fashioned, that’s the whole point. Whether you’re a policeman, fireman or dressing for the office, there’s a certain uniform. Just look at Zena the Warrior Princess, or even Julia Gillard.

Even if you’re not heading for battle, looking more like you’re ready for the set of Madman than a night out will make you feel like you’re really heading somewhere.

The office clearly isn’t as progressive as your nearest nightclub, and maybe there is a thing or two to be learned from the conservative dress standards of the 1950s.

  1. Skirts must be mid-thigh or longer (including slits);
  2. Tops must bare no midriff or plunge at the back;
  3. No outfit is to show cleavage;
  4. Sequins and sparkle are best left at the cocktail bar; and
  5. Shoes must be closed-toe and consist of heels/platforms no higher than three inches.

As modern fashion rightly relaxes these standards, there is still the risk of  taking things too far – to be cast as a frivolous female.

No matter what rung of the corporate ladder you are on, if you are more cleavage than corporate attire, more stiletto than sensible, people will notice your outfit, rather than your professionalism.

Think Julia Roberts as Erin Brokovich, or better yet, Pretty Woman.

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Comments

  • Phillip at 6:22pm on 06/07/11

    Very good lol

    makes you think how you can turn anything into fashion lol

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