Columns
10 years on Image

10 years on

Top yachts to compete at Docklands
Read more >>

Away from the desk Image

Away from the desk

The little bent tree
Read more >>

Chamber update Image

Chamber update

Strategic goals for 2020
Read more >>

Docklander Image

Docklander

Dental saving kids in Timor Leste
Read more >>

Docklands Secrets Image

Docklands Secrets

Conflicting speeds
Read more >>

Fashion Image

Fashion

Top five street style trends
Read more >>

Health and Wellbeing Image

Health and Wellbeing

Setting SMART goals for 2020
Read more >>

Business Image

Business

Best noodles close to work
Read more >>

Owners Corporation Law Image

Owners Corporation Law

Embedded electricity networks are ripping off consumers
Read more >>

Pets Corner Image

Pets Corner

On the wild side
Read more >>

Precinct Perspectives

Celebrate at Victoria Harbour
Read more >>

SkyPad Living Image

SkyPad Living

Vertical dwelling is now mainstream
Read more >>

Street Art Image

Street Art

Goodbye from Blender Studios
Read more >>

Sustainability

A sustainable festive season
Read more >>

The District

Supporting Kids Under Cover this Christmas
Read more >>

We Live Here Image

We Live Here

Short-stay violence spurs action
Read more >>

Abby's Angle  Image

Abby's Angle

The symbolism of the arrow
Read more >>

Docklands Secret - September 2012

28 Aug 2012

Docklands Secret - September 2012 Image

When does civil twilight end?

It seems that Docklands urban artwork Civil Twilight End is somewhat noisier than initially intended.

The bell tower, situated at the corner of Bourke and Village streets in Batman’s Hill, was commissioned by Equiset, as part of the Docklands Urban Art Program.

The artwork, curated by Simon Maidment of Satellite Art Projects, is designed to ring at the moment civil twilight ends – the time at which the sun has dropped six degrees below the horizon.

Docklands News was under the impression that the bell was meant to ring once. In fact, an article published on the Satellite Art Projects website before the artwork was installed states the same.

“The bell housed in the tower will ring once per day, at the moment of Civil Twilight End, when the sun had disappeared from view but while the sky is still illuminated by it,” the article states.

However, Docklands News has noticed that the bell is now ringing three times in a row to mark the end of civil twilight. When we asked Mr Maidment about the extra ringing, he said the bell was set to ring three times, each ring being five seconds apart.

He said this was how the artists, Kate Daw and Stewart Russell, had wanted the bell to function. What confused us was, which of these three bells signals the end of civil twilight. Is it the first, second or third?

Mr Maidment said it was the first of the three bells that marked the end of civil twilight in the “area”.

“More accurately, it’s the moment of civil twilight end for the ‘area’ to an accuracy of degrees, minutes and seconds of latitude and longitude, and hours and minutes in clock-time resolution,” Mr Maidment said. 

Mr Maidment explained that the moment of civil twilight was not necessarily a second long but, rather, a block of time and the calculations used to determine this period of time related to an area rather than a spot.

This means that the length of civil twilight end changes throughout the year as the sun moves away from the area faster or slower depending on its distance.

Stay in touch with Docklands. Subscribe to FREE monthly e-Newspaper.

You must be registered with Docklands News to be able to post comments.
To register, please click here.