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10 years on

Issue 22, October – November 2007
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Away from the desk

The little bent tree
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Chamber update

Harbour Town is rebranding
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Councillor Profile Image

Councillor Profile

The making of a Lord Mayor
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Docklander

Melbourne’s history through costumes
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Docklands Secrets

Politician disrespects us
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Fashion

Top five street style trends
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Good News Bill

A journey through the past of Docklands
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Health and Wellbeing

Laughter, the key to working together
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Letters

Begging to differ
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New Businesses Image

New Businesses

Morgan Brooks & Tolhurst Druce Emerson
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Owners Corporation Law Image

Owners Corporation Law

Not all liability policies are created equal
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Pets Corner

The very social Axl
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SkyPad Living Image

SkyPad Living

Activating vertical villages
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We Live Here Image

We Live Here

Short-stays behind property price pain
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What Women Want - May 2017

07 May 2017

By Abby Crawford 

We all have a voice. Or rather, we all have a right to have a voice.

Life is important to each and every one of us and we all have a choice as to how we live that life. Sure, we can be taught right from wrong. We can be shown how to succeed and we can even be introduced to opportunities that open doors for us to believe that our voice has indeed been heard … but what about those of us less fortunate?

I’m sure we all agree that we all should have a voice, that we are entitled to be heard – but I wonder how many of us actually might have the chance to help someone less fortunate be heard?

I’m sure we all believe we are striving for equality – but what about just acceptance of our differences?

I wonder how many of us could comfortably sit with someone so different from ourselves and accept an equality of value – to not try to compare each other’s values, but to literally recognise the worth and value of another soul that is incredibly different to you. To recognise the value of differences.

I think there are people who would find this to be a terrifying situation – to sit, to spend time, with someone completely outside your comfort zone.

I think that there are others who would simply not allow the thought to enter their carefully manicured mindsets – those who simply shun others who are too different from their perceptions of acceptable recognition.

And then there are those who are different. There are those who see it all, who see their worth, who see their value and who see their differences as the very thing that makes them so special.

You see, I’ve had great opportunity these last few months, to be involved with some of these people. The people I had thought of as less fortunate, the people I had acknowledged would find it difficult to have their own voice, the people I felt – in all honesty – a little sorry for.

I always, hand on heart, have believed we do all deserve to have a voice and to have it heard. Yet, upon reflection of my life, I hadn’t really been that involved before. I hadn’t participated. I hadn’t given action to my thoughts, my ethics, my beliefs in this area before. But I am now.

And I can tell you that there is a life force that can draw rainbows more magnificent than any you have seen on a stormy day inside these people. And I can tell you that those who are passionately supporting them to have their voice heard – their absolute true voice, their choice, their decision, their thoughts, their soul heard – are life-changing people.

I spend my time proudly beside people I never thought I’d meet, having conversations I never could have imagined having and fighting for justices so small in the scheme of mankind that it is easy to not realise that they even need to be fought for.

It is the differences in people that create the magic in life. And it is only by participating, by including people of all abilities into our world – our full world, our community, our lifestyles, our day-to-day living – that we realise that those who we think are less fortunate are, in fact, often richer in ways that you or I never knew how to even count.

What a woman wants is to love and protect those “less fortunate”, but what a woman needs to know is that there is a great strength in our differences and there is a wonderful opportunity to learn from all of our abilities. Please, make sure your voice and your choice is heard, but also listen to those around – sometimes being heard is all it takes to make a difference.

With much love,

Abby

PS, you can reach me at (JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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